Lichen and Beech Abstract – Weekly Photo Challenge: Abstract

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Lichen and Beech Abstract

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The shapes and tones in this photo of lichen and fallen Beech leaves seemed to fit perfectly with the Weekly Photo Challenge: Abstract by The Daily Post.  Sunlight’s play of light and shadow made a natural vignette effect, enhancing the abstract feel.  This photo was taken while on a spiritual retreat last summer in Le Roy, Michigan.

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Reading Reflections: Iris Grace – “Different is brilliant!”

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Photo Credit to Arabella Carter-Johnson

If you have not yet heard the inspiring story of Iris Grace (website link, facebook page link), I am very pleased to share it with you.

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Dancing Dry – Weekly Photo Challenge: Dance

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Dancing Dry

Dancing Dry – click to view larger

In a recent visit to Frederick Meijer Gardens, I captured this photo of a newly-hatched butterfly fanning its still-damp wings.  Initially I had hoped for a crisp frame showing the details of the wings, but the dim lighting thwarted that plan and revealed an appealing alternative.  This seemed like an appropriate selection for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Dance from The Daily Post.

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The Spirit of the Depths: Active Imagination, the Red Book, and the Recovery of an Imaginal Epistemology

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orpheus1200480C.G. Jung’s Red Book is a bombastic volume, much like a medieval illuminated manuscript, recording in images and narrative reflections Jung’s encounters with the unconscious. The content of the Red Book was created by recording—and thereby preserving—his dreams and visions, his imaginal research during this “confrontation with the unconscious.”  In the few years since its publication, there has been a fair amount of scholarship on the Red Book, much of it focusing on the psychological, historical, personal, or literary contexts.

But what does it mean?

As far as I have been able to discern, the main contribution the Red Book makes is on the matter of knowing; it is a product of imaginal (not imaginary!) research that can tell us much about imaginal research. From this perspective, the Red Book is to be viewed not as a literary, mystical, or artistic product (though it certainly is all of those to some degree), but a product of imaginal knowing that provides us with an invitation and a means to re-imagine our own knowing. Even if we decline, the Red Book invites us to consider the imaginal encountered in dreams and imagination as a valid way of research and knowing…

This is a brief adapted excerpt/introduction from a paper on Jung’s Red Book that I posted on The Temenos Center for Jungian and Archetypal Studies site. As I thought it might be of interest to some here, I am posting a link below (since the reblog function doesn’t work on self-hosted sites).

Read the rest of the paper here

Reading Reflections: Restoration Agriculture Ch 8 & 9

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Photo credit to Emily Martorano on justfarm.org

 

Having decided midway through reading this book, Restoration Agriculture by Mark Shepard, to blog my reactions and reflections, I am continuing this post series (will I finish it? who knows) with Chapter 8: Other Biomes and Chapter 9: Livestock & Restoration Agriculture.

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Chalk Mandala – Weekly Photo Challenge: Vibrant

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Temenos Chalk Mandala

Temenos Chalk Mandala / Art by Rich Francisco : Photo by Alainafae – click to view larger

For The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Vibrant, I chose this picture of the riotously colorful chalk mandala that the Temenos Center’s Artist-in-Residence, Rich Francisco (See his other work on his facebook page or his website), drew for our Open House on Sunday Continue reading

Tentative Growth – Weekly Photo Challenge: Optimism

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Tentative Growth of Box Alder in Spring

Tentative Growth of Box Alder in Spring – click to view larger

Prompted by The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Optimism, I chose this picture from last April of delicate new leaves on young Box Alder trees that had been hacked down the previous summer.  It is truly astonishing how fast Box Alder Maple can grow in spite of poor conditions or trauma, and this trait of the Box Alder Maple makes me optimistic about prevailing in my own endeavors.  While the leaves are brand new and very vulnerable, it shows the optimism of Spring for the coming Summer.

 

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Abundant Harvest – Weekly Photo Challenge: Weight(less)

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Abundant Harvest of Wild Grape

Abundant Harvest of Wild Grape – click to view larger

Trees bent down to eye level by the weight of Wild Grape vines heavy in their abundance at the nearby park we love displayed the Weekly Photo Challenge: Weight(less) to me.

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Shining Circle – Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle

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Summer Solstice Sparkler Drawing

Shining Circle – click to view larger

The first image that came to mind when I saw the Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle was this picture from the Summer Solstice of 2014.  Using sparklers, found ubiquitously at big box stores around that time of year here in the States, and very low shutter speeds, we drew (after many, many, many attempts) a circle of light containing the Awen symbol.

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Warmth, Darkness, and Family – Weekly Photo Challenge: Now

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Family, Lights in the Darkness

Family, Lights in the Darkness – click to view larger

In response to The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Now, I reflect on how I am thankful for the family that are still with me today.

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